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How to Hack Wi-Fi: Creating an Evil Twin Wireless Access Point to Eavesdrop on Data

Welcome back, my greenhorn hackers! Now that we're familiar with the technologies, terminology, and the aircrack-ng suite, we can finally start hacking Wi-Fi. Our first task will be to creating an evil twin access point. Many new hackers are anxious to crack Wi-Fi passwords to gain some free bandwidth (don't worry, we'll get to that), but there are so many other Wi-Fi hacks that are far more powerful and put so much more at risk than a bit of bandwidth.

How To: Hack Wi-Fi Networks with Bettercap

There are many tools out there for Wi-Fi hacking, but few are as integrated and well-rounded as Bettercap. Thanks to an impressively simple interface that works even over SSH, it's easy to access many of the most powerful Wi-Fi attacks available from anywhere. To capture handshakes from both attended and unattended Wi-Fi networks, we'll use two of Bettercap's modules to help us search for weak Wi-Fi passwords.

How To: Build a Beginner Hacking Kit with the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

If you want to follow Null Byte tutorials and try out Kali Linux, the Raspberry Pi is a perfect way to start. In 2018, the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ was released featuring a better CPU, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and Ethernet built in. Our recommended Kali Pi kit for beginners learning ethical hacking on a budget runs the "Re4son" Kali kernel and includes a compatible wireless network adapter and a USB Rubber Ducky.

How To: Intercept Images from a Security Camera Using Wireshark

It's common for IoT devices like Wi-Fi security cameras to host a website for controlling or configuring the camera that uses HTTP instead of the more secure HTTPS. This means anyone with the network password can see traffic to and from the camera, allowing a hacker to intercept security camera footage if anyone is watching the camera's HTTP viewing page.

How To: Introduction to Modern Cryptography

Cryptography is the science of keeping secrets, or more specifically, the science of disguising them. As a point of fact, cryptography has progressed quite a bit farther and now encompasses file and message integrity, sender authentication, and pseudo-random number generators.

How To: Lock Down Your DNS with a Pi-Hole to Avoid Trackers, Phishing Sites & More

The Pi-hole project is a popular DNS-level ad blocker, but it can be much more than that. Its DNS-level filtering can also be used as a firewall of sorts to prevent malicious websites from resolving, as well as to keep privacy-killing trackers such as Google Analytics from ever loading in the browser. Let's take a look at setting a Pi-hole up and customizing a blacklist to suit your needs.

Mac for Hackers: How to Set Up a MacOS System for Wi-Fi Packet Capturing

MacOS isn't known as an ideal operating system for hacking without customization, but it includes native tools that allow easy control of the Wi-Fi radio for packet sniffing. Changing channels, scanning for access points, and even capturing packets all can be done from the command line. We'll use aliasing to set some simple commands for easy native packet capture on a macOS system.

How To: Detect Bluetooth Low Energy Devices in Realtime with Blue Hydra

Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is the de facto wireless protocol choice by many wearables developers, and much of the emerging internet of things (IoT) market. Thanks to it's near ubiquity in modern smartphones, tablets, and computers, BLE represents a large and frequently insecure attack surface. This surface can now be mapped with the use of Blue Hydra.

How To: Stay as Anonymous as Possible Online

There are lots of people who want to stay anonymous online, and lots of reasons they want to do this. Staying anonymous on the internet isn't easy, and it's probably possible to trace almost anyone with enough time and resources. A lot of people think that they're completely secure with just one method of cover. For example, a lot of people thought anyone using the Tor network was nearly untraceable, but then things like this often cast doubt on just how secure these networks are. Unless you ...

How To: Hack WPA & WPA2 Wi-Fi Passwords with a Pixie-Dust Attack Using Airgeddon

Design flaws in many routers can allow hackers to steal Wi-Fi credentials, even if WPA or WPA2 encryption is used with a strong password. While this tactic used to take up to 8 hours, the newer WPS Pixie-Dust attack can crack networks in seconds. To do this, a modern wireless attack framework called Airgeddon is used to find vulnerable networks, and then Bully is used to crack them.

How To: Create a Wireless Spy Camera Using a Raspberry Pi

Surveillance is always a useful tool in a hacker's arsenal, whether deployed offensively or defensively. Watching targets yourself isn't always practical, and traditional surveillance camera systems can be costly, lacking in capabilities, or both. Today, we will use motionEyeOS running on a Raspberry Pi Zero to create a small, concealable Wi-Fi connected spy camera that is both affordable and easily concealed.

Rasberry Pi: Introduction

Most of you probably heard about Rasberry Pi and if you haven't; what is wrong with you? But nothing less a Rasberry Pi is a computer a very small computer. Despite these size limitations, the Rasberry Pi is to not be underestimated. Not only can it do anything like a normal laptop or desktop, but, in my opinion on of the coolest features is that it boots off a Micro SD card. It can do anything that you want, but it's built to be played with. A hacker heaven.

How To: Steal macOS Files with the USB Rubber Ducky

If you need a tiny, flexible attack platform for raining down human-interface-device (HID) attacks on unattended computers, the USB Rubber Ducky is the most popular tool for the job. By loading the Ducky with custom firmware, you can design new attacks to be effective against even air-gapped computers without internet access. Today, you'll learn to write a payload to make "involuntary backups" through copying a targeted folder to the Ducky's USB mass storage.

How to Hack Wi-Fi: Choosing a Wireless Adapter for Hacking

Welcome back, my budding hackers. So many of you are interested in hacking Wi-Fi that I have decided to revisit my Wi-Fi Hacking series with some updated and more in-depth material. I strongly suggest that you look at some of my earlier posts, such as "Getting Started with Terms and Technologies" and "Getting Started with the Aircrack-ng Suite of Wi-Fi Hacking Tools," before continuing here. If you're ready, you can also check out our updated 2017 buying guide here.

How To: VPN Your IoT & Media Devices with a Raspberry Pi PIA Routertraffic

Virtual private networks, or VPNs, are popular for helping you stay anonymous online by changing your IP address, encrypting traffic, and hiding your location. However, common IoT devices, media players, and smart TVs are hard to connect to a VPN, but we have a solution: Turn a Raspberry Pi into a router running through PIA VPN, which will ensure every connected device gets the VPN treatment.

How To: Steal Usernames & Passwords Stored in Firefox on Windows 10 Using a USB Rubber Ducky

A lot of people still trust their web browsers to remember every online account password for them. If you're one of those users, you need to adopt a more secure way of managing passwords, because browser-stored passwords are hacker gold mines. With a USB Rubber Ducky and physical access to your computer, they can have a screenshot of all your credentials in their inbox in less than 60 seconds.

How To: Protect Yourself from Someone Trying to Hack into Your Mac

If you read my previous post, "How to Hack into a Mac Without the Password", you know that it is very easy to break into someone's Mac if you have physical access to the computer. Now the question that lies is, how do we protect ourselves from this happening to us? Well, here is a way that guarantees that no one will be able to change your password through OS X Recovery.

News: How Zero-Day Exploits Are Bought & Sold

Most of you already know that a zero-day exploit is an exploit that has not yet been revealed to the software vendor or the public. As a result, the vulnerability that enables the exploit hasn't been patched. This means that someone with a zero-day exploit can hack into any system that has that particular configuration or software, giving them free reign to steal information, identities, credit card info, and spy on victims.