Xss Search Results

How To: Advanced Techniques to Bypass & Defeat XSS Filters, Part 1

There is no shortage of defenses against cross-site scripting (XSS) since it is so prevalent on the web today. Filters are one of the most common implementations used to prevent this type of attack, usually configured as a blacklist of known bad expressions or based on regex evaluation. But there is hope with a wide variety of techniques that can be used to defeat these filters.

How To: Advanced Techniques to Bypass & Defeat XSS Filters, Part 2

Cross-site scripting can be one of the easiest vulnerabilities to discover, but to be successful with this type of attack, it is essential to learn how to get past filters. In the previous guide, we explored some ways to do this, such as abusing attributes and event handlers and tricking the application into accepting unusual characters. Now, let's take a look at more techniques used to defeat filters.

How To: Write an XSS Cookie Stealer in JavaScript to Steal Passwords

JavaScript is one of the most common languages used on the web. It can automate and animate website components, manage website content, and carry out many other useful functions from within a webpage. The scripting language also has many functions which can be used for malicious purposes, including stealing a user's cookies containing passwords and other information.

Exploiting XSS with BeEF: Part 1

BeEF is an XSS-exploiting framework that lets you "hook" or gain control of victim web browsers. In this part of XSS exploitation, we will be working on finding an XSS-vulnerable website. We can simply do this by Google Dorking.

How To: How Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) Attacks Sneak into Unprotected Websites (Plus: How to Block Them)

XSS stands for cross-site scripting, which is a form of web-based exploitation that uses client-side vulnerabilities in a web page to execute malicious JavaScript codes. JavaScript is referred to as "cross-site" because it usually involves an external website containing the malicious code. That code is most commonly used to steal cookies with a website that the attacker created and hosted on another server. The cookies can then be used to escalate privileges and gain root access to someone's ...

How To: Beginner's Guide to OWASP Juice Shop, Your Practice Hacking Grounds for the 10 Most Common Web App Vulnerabilities

Web application vulnerabilities are one of the most crucial points of consideration in any penetration test or security evaluation. While some security areas require a home network or computer for testing, creating a test website to learn web app security requires a slightly different approach. For a safe environment to learn about web app hacking, the OWASP Juice Shop can help.

How To: Hack Forum Accounts with Password-Stealing Pictures

The pictures we upload online are something we tend to think of as self-expression, but these very images can carry code to steal our passwords and data. Profile pictures, avatars, and image galleries are used all over the internet. While all images carry digital picture data — and many also carry metadata regarding camera or photo edits — it's far less expected that an image might actually be hiding malicious code.

Hack Like a Pro: How to Hack Web Apps, Part 6 (Using OWASP ZAP to Find Vulnerabilities)

Welcome back, my tenderfoot hackers! Web apps are often the best vector to an organization's server/database, an entry point to their entire internal network. By definition, the web app is designed to take an input from the user and send that input back to the server or database. In this way, the attacker can send their malicious input back to the servers and network if the web app is not properly secured.

How To: Got Beef? Getting Started with BeEF

With the the general computer users understanding of Information security rising (at least to the point of not clicking on unknown links), and operating system security getting better by default. We need to look for new and creative ways to gain a foothold in a system.

Hack Like a Pro: How to Hack Web Browsers with BeEF

Welcome back, my greenhorn hackers. I had promised new series on hacking web applications, mobile devices, and even Facebook here on Null Byte, and I intend to deliver you those sometime this year. In each of those topics, I will introduce you to new hacking tools and techniques, though, one tool that we will be using in all of those areas is called the Browser Exploitation Framework, or BeEF (don't ask me what the lowercase "e" stands for).

How To: Web Development for Hackers 1.1: HTML,CSS,JS

hello hackers,newbies and followers of this great community, after some research here in our community, I noticed that there is not even one tutorial that teach Web Development. We have a lot of tutorials on how to hack web site but many do not know exactly how a web site is composed, then I decided, meeting the community's needs, begin to teach people how to develop web sites.

How To: Take Pictures Through a Victim's Webcam with BeEF

Recently, I've been experimenting with BeEF (Browser Exploitation Framework), and to say the least, I'm hooked. When using BeEF, you must "hook" the victims browser. This means that you must run the script provided by BeEF, which is titled "hook.js", in the victims browser. Once you've done that, you can run commands against the victims browser and cause all kinds of mayhem. Among these commands, there is an option to use the victims webcam. This is what we'll be doing here today, so, let's g...

How To: Use Google's Advanced Protection Program to Secure Your Account from Phishing

It's easy to have your password stolen. Important people like executives, government workers, journalists, and activists face sophisticated phishing attacks to compromise their online accounts, often targeting Google account credentials. To reduce this risk, Google created the Advanced Protection Program, which uses U2F security keys to control account access and make stolen passwords worthless.

News: Easy Skype iPhone Exploit Exposes Your Phone Book & More

Like the recent XSS 0day exploit found in the Mac and Windows versions of Skype, a similar one has been found in the Skype app for iPhone. The vulnerability allows an attacker to send a message that contains malicious JavaScript code in the "Name" parameter. This code can steal your phonebook, crash the app, and potentially do a lot worse. The URI scheme is improperly identified for the web-kit browser. Instead of going to a blank browser page, it defaults to "file://". The code could steal a...

IPsec Tools of the Trade: Don't Bring a Knife to a Gunfight

Pull up outside any construction site and you'll see tools scattered about—hammers, jigsaws, nail guns, hydraulic pipe benders—these are the tools of the trade. You would be hard-pressed to build a home or office building with just your hands! On that same page, security professionals also have their own go-to tools that they use on the job site, only their job site is your server.

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