Windows 10 : Against Privacy

Against Privacy

Windows 10 : Against Privacy

The title might not be in harmony with the post, but thinking a good title that perfectly matches your post... isn't that easy. Especially for this post.

And it's not like I'm sharing any personal experience, mine is a WinXP machine that wouldn't even pick 7. I'm rather telling what I've read over at THN for the past month or so, so for those of you who've been tuned to it, you can guess what I'm talking about.

Now we've been against surveillance for some time, so I thought of telling about it for those who've not noticed it or read about it.

Windows 10 Is Not Privacy-Friendly

For those who like to do the research for themselves, here you go. This is the place from where I will post a few relevant links and then close the article, without a signature image or line.

The idea is to be a bit more considerate than that, but since none of the material is mine, that'd be a problem.

And there is nothing that can not be understood in just 1 careless read, so you're better off with only it than with some introductions, which will not be worth our time.

But of course, here I am, ready to respond to anything you may ask that I can!

Windows 10 Keylogger
Windows 10 doesn't stop spying
Windows 10 stealing your bandwidth
WiFi Sense
Aggressive update

Not a very good tradeoff, if you ask me. But I prefer complete chaos, total privacy. So it depends on where it lies on your scale, but in general, I wouldn't recommend it for non-whitehat activities.

The End

These were just some of the articles, but the internal linking should point you to more.

34 Comments

I've been following the whole Win10 debate via computeractive and webuser mags, as well as the online stuff. For what it's worth I wouldn't touch Win10 with a shitty stick! My Win7 machine is currently being stripped of all of it's relevant files before being swapped over to Fedora, like the rest of my laptops. The way that MS will effectively "run" your machine once they've forced Win10 on you is really scary. Given their dominance of the marketplace for home users then the average Joe can wave goodbye to any concept of privacy. And again, the majority of the public consign their right to privacy to the dustbin for the sake of convenience. Not me bud.

Do they really say it to be for convinience? In that case, I believe the people are in for a BIG surprise when the boxes actually open.

-The Joker

Windows works for those who don't ask. You can't show terminal to random people. That was the objective. People don't care about security. We do.

We do have options between total privacy and ease of use, ie. the noob-friendly distros of linux.

-The Joker

No. Linux will never be as user friendly as the society wants.

As soon as you call it "linux" people start sneezing: "What is this! Get me out of nere! How do I close windows?!" Believe me, they think I'm good at computer because I know how to open two windows at the same time, I swear.

I'm with Ciuffy on this one. The common man doesn't care about their security. The reason that we see that Microsoft is spying on us is because we do care about security, unlike others.

And it is also true that Linux is never as user friendly as society wants. My classmates think I am some kind of Matrix-hacker because I was moving files around in a Linux terminal...

-Phoenix750

Linux is the OS they need, but do not deserve right now.

I don't really mean it getting very user friendly, but usually people who switch to linux ready to change their habits and the feel of their system, are not known to come back to Windows.

So I believe the noob-friendly distros like Mint to be good enough. Of course, I'm not talking about new users taking up Arch or Gentoo or Slackware and finding it to be user friendly.

Ending it with Android, the most popular linux distribution. Of course it can get AS user friendly AS wanted, but that is a complex scenario, taking in account the market monopolies.

-The Joker

Seriously fucking hate this spying shit, anonymous should fuck em up

They wouldn't care for that. After all, it's corporate decision and people have the right to choose their OS. Anyone can switch to Mint or Debian or Kali, to make Microsoft change their decision.

-The Joker

People don't even know what OS means. Call that choice.

The resources of anonymous are limited. There is no chance that will happen. NSA would crush anonymous.

NSA would crush anyone who even tried to stand up against them, honestly. Atleast hacktivists, that is.

-Phoenix750

What tools or technology NSA is using?

Have a look at my article. It isn't so much their technologies, it's the almost infinite reach that the US law grants them.

-Phoenix750

I think NSA must have developed some secret technologies which we don't know...NSA has great resources and people.

The same can be said for pretty much every agency.

-Phoenix750

Due to some AJAX error, I can't reply on comments since yesterday. So I guess I have to write it here, in a single comment.

Ciuffy, Phoenix750: Yes, it can not get too user-friendly, because it is made to be customizable and personalised. But, I believe, some distros are user-friendly enough for the society, like Mint or Ubuntu, which (are said to) don't need you to even touch the terminal for functionality that Windows provides.

Ciuffy: Yes, most of them don't, and it's a joke on the concept of 'choice', but even if we tell them what an OS is, they'd be reluctant to ever leave Windows. In fact, I explain OS to them as 'something like Windows/Android'. And for those people, security lies lower on the scale than convenience. But world, needs a lot of people who think the situation to be under their control, to be able to run, and that needs enough ignorance to do so.

Blue Charles: You should have a look at the data leaked by Snowden, or the news at THN.

OccupyTheWeb, Phoenix750: NSA is extremely powerful, yes (anyone who is surprised can go check the surveillance section on THN), but power is too unstable, because it's owner always wants perfect order in a world built on chaos. (It's like rolling some dices for your life, where result is fixed for each sum, and once activated, you get shot as the sum repeats. If all are activated, you get perfect order.) So, when their legal power fades away, they'll be like bare lambs in a jungle. (That, of course, refers to a downfall of the governing bodies.)

Phoenix750: Hacktivists resemble the need for proper distribution of power, so the NSA wouldn't dare crush them. They're the people keeping humanity away from the real dangers. If they're gone, ethics will be a relic of the past. The situation is similar to what'd happen if Batman is gone from Gotham City, it'll be ripped apart. But, of course, as long as they don't have absolute power of dictatorship, that is, which they're very close to achieving, but before that they'll be destroyed with the absolute chaos that comes with it.

-The Joker

The real world isn't a movie. There is a reason hacktivists don't target the NSA actively: they know they'll be annihilated in just a few weeks. The NSA may not have complete control, but at the moment they are the supper power, and Anonymous or any hacker group can't change that.

The only way to bring down the NSA is bringing down the US itself, and that would require an enormous war effort, and more lifes will be sacrificed in trade for too little.

The very best we or anyone can do at the moment against the NSA is hiding from them, but don't even consider rebelling against the NSA (yet).

-Phoenix750

Maybe my words came out to be more dramatic than I intended them to. Without any hacktivists around, NSA and FBI will have all the power. And then, it gets too easy to destroy the unbalanced power.

No individual has ever been able to balance limitless power by himself, and NSA, FBI, Government etc. aren't on opposite sides. Give them more power than they can control/balance, and the whole structure collapses.

I mean, they can't handle the chaos that comes with limitless unbalanced power, no one can (except someone whom the chaos won't damage, that is). That's the sole reason this world is divided into so many democracies. As to God, I'm not fairly sure about the origin of this idea, maybe some overlord of humanity, presumably an extinct alien empire, or collection of some.

So, unbalanced power is not stable. That's what I mean by 'chaos that comes with power'. And I can prove that humans want as much stability as possible, like everything else that exists in this universe, atleast.

I don't need to fight/rebel, because once they reach the end of the path they're following, and if it happens at the time I expect it to, complete annihilation of what they even stand for isn't as hard as you think it to be. In fact, those at ISIS don't have anything in their heads. Their end is as near as the drop of the economies which they're playing with.

-The Joker

No, they didn't come out any more dramatic than I intended. Yes, the world isn't a movie, but I didn't mean the speed of world ripping itself apart, but the action itself. There are more complications to the idea in reality than in fiction, but it is still much more probable than anything else. And that is what makes it slower in reality, but the result will be same.

-The Joker

WIth All these terrorist attacks going on,if NSA spying is only to gather information and thwart such attacks,then i have no problem with them spying on people...

Those who sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither.

-Phoenix750

Most people with at least a moderate understanding of IT could make tracing them hard. They could use TOR, @then whatever(millions of possibilities to hide their messages). This would make the NSA take ages to decrypt messages let alone start on tracking who they were. Therefore it can be assumed that in order to be truly effective, bots may not be enough as they rely on algorithms.There are 2 something billion people on the internet. It actually makes no sense to me. Do they have crazy amounts of staff?

@For example if I wanted to do communication, I could send a public key, asking client to send me his hashed (salted,and only the client and the server know the salt) private key using the private key I could send an AES encryption key, and it'll be really hard to trace me.

No one sends anyone their private key. Suppose this scenario even happens, how will you guarantee the successful distribution of the salt without unauthorized interference? You'll also need to crack the hash to retrieve the private key and if your salt has been compromised, who's to say they can't crack the hash like you have? Also, how and why would you use the private key to send an AES encryption key?

So I could start an AES encrypted chat, but I do now see the several flaws in my argument. But my point is that you could make it harder, and therefore how do NSA have the capacity analyze so much traffic properly. Why don't hacktivists write bots to flood the internet with encrypted traffic, exhaust NSA's rescources

NSA is what keeps them under check. Considering how decentralised they are, they can not afford NSA going away/bankrupt, because then there will no one to prevent anybody causing them 'illegal' troubles, and the situation only worsens in case of internal conflicts.

-The Joker

It wouldn't be hard to trace you, but rather decrypting what you sent. NSA can trace anyone on TOR with about 80% accuracy (that's what they say). As to decrypting, in some instances it was not needed to serve punishment. They'd rather spy on you manually if you have too much encrypted traffic, and for that they do have staff.

-The Joker

That's a route, where no matter who wins, the whole of human race will lose, except the winner. I have problem if the rulers decide to go that route without explaining this to the general population, because I'm not willing to lose without trying, or even knowing.

-The Joker

i think that its bs how much info they collect why do they need all this i like not doing work but at a certain point its plain old creepy and at some point windows gets hacked gg. there goes everything look up an ip and you have so much data they can know you voice and there will be flaws and when it happens everyone will be pissed that they lost so much info but at my school i can get credit cards # they use 4 number passwords i show them how to get around it and they look at me like idiots. i sort feel like we need to do something against it. some ppl think that if you use encryptions your a hacker, and that honest ppl dont have anything to hide so why does the nsa need to look

sy

Yes. I'd add that I consider every bit of information they collect to be against life in general and human race in particular. I can't really tell why they need to look into honest people's data, but I do have my explanation on why would they want all the data in the world.

-The Joker

An honest person may have nothing to hide yes, but let's face it: no one is truely honest! Everyone has their little secrets, everyone. I believe this is what MS wants from people (aswell as all the other companies. MS isn't the only bully here).

-Phoenix750

You mean...MS and other companies want secrets of people? Sounds a bit strange/extreme.

-The Joker

I am not blaming MS. I am blaming the capitalist society we live in. It's all about profit, and companies will do whatever it takes to make profits. That's the way capitalism works.

Don't think I am glorifying communism, but capitalism is far from a great system when you think about it.

Enough about politics, it all comes down to the fact that companies want every little detail about costumers, so they can milk people even more. Throw some NSA bullshit in it, and you get a state of spying corporations.

-Phoenix750

I'm not here to make a political statement or to get into the finer details but the reality is, despite this fear of the NSA and other agencies, they can't hack themselves out of a wet paper bag. All they can do is mass snoop and catch NOTHING.

Lets look quickly at the last 4 terrorist activities in the USA:
California: she posted all over the web her intentions. Capacity to prevent her and her husbands actions? Nil.

South Carolina: The guy had a website where he openly said what he was going to do. Capacity to prevent his actions? Nil.

Texas: chatter all over the Internet. Capacity to prevent their actions? Nil

Boston: chatter all over the internet and travelled abroad. Capacity to prevent their actions? Nil. Hell, they barely managed to catch them and only found the brother AFTER someone called it in, that's how incompetent they are.

Their incompetence is best summarized with Silk Roads: how long did he run circles around them? 1 year? 2 years? They only got lucky after a hacker on Reddit said that the Silk Road website was leaking it's IP and he said how it was leaking. Like winning a jackpot, doesn't take skill, just some luck.

They can't even follow the simple instructions that Apple left them with regards to the iPhone. He had one job to do: take the iphone to an IP range that the Iphone will recognize and back up the data to the iCloud, and the guy in charge couldn't even get that straight. I'd fire that idiot on the spot.

I'm not impressed.

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