How to Hack Wi-Fi: Automating Wi-Fi Hacking with Besside-ng

In this how-to, I will be demonstrating a few of the tactical applications of Besside-ng, the hidden gem of the Aircrack-ng suite of Wi-Fi hacking tools. When run with a wireless network adapter capable of packet injection, Besside-ng can harvest WPA handshakes from any network with an active user — and crack WEP passwords outright. Unlike many tools, it requires no special dependencies and can be run via SSH, making it easy to deploy remotely.

How To: Steal macOS Files with the USB Rubber Ducky

If you need a tiny, flexible attack platform for raining down human-interface-device (HID) attacks on unattended computers, the USB Rubber Ducky is the most popular tool for the job. By loading the Ducky with custom firmware, you can design new attacks to be effective against even air-gapped computers without internet access. Today, you'll learn to write a payload to make "involuntary backups" through copying a targeted folder to the Ducky's USB mass storage.

How To: Build a Pumpkin Pi — The Rogue AP & MITM Framework That Fits in Your Pocket

A man-in-the-middle attack places you between your target and the internet, pretending to be a Wi-Fi network while secretly inspecting every packet that flows through the connection. The WiFi-Pumpkin is a rogue AP framework to easily create these fake networks, all while forwarding legitimate traffic to and from the unsuspecting target. Today, we'll learn to set up this framework on a low-cost Raspberry Pi running Kali Linux.

How To: Boot Multiple Operating Systems on the Raspberry Pi with BerryBoot

The Raspberry Pi loads an operating system from whatever SD card you insert, allowing you to keep different operating systems on separate SD cards depending on which OS you wish to run. A tool called BerryBoot cuts down on the number of SD cards needed by providing the ability to boot multiple operating systems from a single SD card, similar to Boot Camp for Mac computers. With BerryBoot, a single 32 GB SD card can hold multiple penetration testing tools and distros.

How To: Modify the USB Rubber Ducky with Custom Firmware

The USB Rubber Ducky comes with two software components, the payload script to be deployed and the firmware which controls how the Ducky behaves and what kind of device it pretends to be. This firmware can be reflashed to allow for custom Ducky behaviors, such as mounting USB mass storage to copy files from any system the Duck is plugged into.

How To: Scrape Target Email Addresses with TheHarvester

Open-source data scraping is an essential reconnaissance tool for government agencies and hackers alike, with big data turning our digital fingerprints into giant neon signs. The problem is no longer whether the right data exists, it's filtering it down to the exact answer you want. TheHarvester is a Python email scraper which does just that by searching open-source data for target email addresses.

How To: Seize Control of a Router with RouterSploit

A router is the core of anyone's internet experience, but sadly most people don't spend much time setting up this critical piece of hardware. Old firmware, default passwords, and other configuration issues continue to haunt many organizations. Exploiting the poor, neglected computer inside these routers has become so popular and easy that automated tools have been created to make the process a breeze.

How To: Set Up a Practice Computer to Kill on a Raspberry Pi 3

The world is full of vulnerable computers. As you learn how to interact with them, it will be both tempting and necessary to test out these newfound skills on a real target. Today, I'll introduce a deliberately vulnerable Raspberry Pi image designed to help you practice and take your hacking skills to the next level.

Social Engineering: How to Use Persuasion to Compromise a Human Target

Social engineering makes headlines because human behavior is often the weakest link of even well-defended targets. Automated social engineering tools can help reclusive hackers touch these techniques, but the study of how to hack human interactions in person is often ignored. Today, we will examine how to use subtle, hard to detect persuasion techniques to compromise a human target.

How to Hack Radio Frequencies: Hijacking FM Radio with a Raspberry Pi & Wire

In our first part on software-defined radio and signals intelligence, we learned how to set up a radio listening station to find and decode hidden radio signals — just like the hackers who triggered the emergency siren system in Dallas, Texas, probably did. Now that we can hear in the radio spectrum, it's time to explore the possibilities of broadcasting in a radio-connected world.

How To: Load & Use Keystroke Injection Payloads on the USB Rubber Ducky

Keystroke injection attacks are popular because they exploit the trust computers have in human interface devices (HIDs). One of the most popular and easily accessible keystroke injection tools is the USB Rubber Ducky from Hack5, which has a huge range of uses beyond simple HID attacks. The USB Rubber Ducky can be used to attack any unlocked computer in seconds or to automate processes and save time.

How To: Set Up Kali Linux on the New $10 Raspberry Pi Zero W

In five short years, three generations of ultra-low-cost Raspberry Pi devices have challenged the boundaries of what a person can do with a $35 computer. With each more powerful and cheaper than the last, the addition of the Pi Zero in 2015 took the same Broadcom BCM2835 processor from the original Pi and put it on a tiny 1.18-inch board. This tiny form factor has powered attacks like PoisonTap and even drones, but the one thing lacking has been the connectivity of the Pi 3.

How To: Set Up a Headless Raspberry Pi Hacking Platform Running Kali Linux

The Raspberry Pi is a credit card-sized computer that can crack Wi-Fi, clone key cards, break into laptops, and even clone an existing Wi-Fi network to trick users into connecting to the Pi instead. It can jam Wi-Fi for blocks, track cell phones, listen in on police scanners, broadcast an FM radio signal, and apparently even fly a goddamn missile into a helicopter.

How To: Punchabunch Just Made SSH Local Forwarding Stupid Easy

SSH local forwarding is a must for covering your tracks and getting out there to do your work. Also called SSH tunneling, this process will put one or more steps between your machine and the machine you're working on, for security and other purposes. It can be a bit daunting for newbies to get down, and that's where Punchabunch comes in.

How to Hack Wi-Fi: Capturing WPA Passwords by Targeting Users with a Fluxion Attack

With tools such as Reaver becoming less and less viable options for penetration testers as ISPs replace vulnerable routers, there becomes fewer certainties about which tools will work against a particular target. If you don't have time to crack the WPA password, or it is unusually strong, it can be hard to figure out your next step. Luckily, nearly all systems have one common vulnerability you can count on—users!

How To: Create a Reusable Burner OS with Docker, Part 2: Customizing Our Hacking Container

In the first part of my containers series, we learned how to install Docker on our local machine, pull down "hello-world" and Ubuntu containers, SSH into containers, and install software when in a container. Now, we're going to work on building, customizing, and storing our refined hacking Ubuntu container. Before we dive right in, though, let's make sure we still have a functional Docker installation.

How To: Create a Reusable Burner OS with Docker, Part 1: Making an Ubuntu Hacking Container

Containers are isolated software instances representing applications, servers, and even operating systems—complete with all of their dependencies, libraries configuration files, etc.—and they're taking over the corporate world. The ephemeral, portable nature of containers help them stay current and speedy, and they can work on pretty much any computer, virtual machine, and cloud.

How To: Slip a Backdoor into PHP Websites with Weevely

Backdoors are convenient to leave behind once you've already found a way into a server, and they can come in handy for a variety of reasons. They're good for developers who want a quick way into machines they're working on, or for systems administrators who want similar access. Of course, backdoors are also a hacker's best friend, and can be added in a variety of ways. One good tool for doing this is Weevely, which uses a snippet of PHP code.

Mac for Hackers: How to Organize Your Tools by Pentest Stages

With all of the bare-bones setup out of the way in our Mac for Hackers series, your Apple machine should be ready to run a significant amount of pentesting tools. We can pull tools from GitHub and compile them, we can pull dependencies or tools from Homebrew, we have both Python and Ruby. Everything is ready to go and now it's time to start building a toolbox on our local host.

How To: Install Gitrob on Kali Linux to Mine GitHub for Credentials

GitHub is an extremely popular site that allows developers to store source code and interact with other users about their projects. Anyone can download public, open-source files on GitHub manually or with Git, and anyone can fork off someone's project to expand or improve it into its own project. It's a really great site for programmers, developers, and even inspiring hackers.

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