Hacking Web Apps

How To: Beat LFI Restrictions with Advanced Techniques

One of the most common web application vulnerabilities is LFI, which allows unauthorized access to sensitive files on the server. Such a common weakness is often safeguarded against, and low-hanging fruit can be defended quite easily. But there are always creative ways to get around these defenses, and we'll be looking at two methods to beat the system and successfully pull off LFI.

How To: Scan Websites for Interesting Directories & Files with Gobuster

One of the first steps in attacking a web application is enumerating hidden directories and files. Doing so can often yield valuable information that makes it easier to execute a precise attack, leaving less room for errors and wasted time. There are many tools available to do this, but not all of them are created equally. Gobuster, a directory scanner written in Go, is definitely worth exploring.

How To: Use Websploit to Scan Websites for Hidden Directories

Websites are often misconfigured in ways that allow an attacker to view directories that are not ordinarily meant to be seen. These directories can contain sensitive information such as private credentials or configuration files that can be used to devise an attack against the server. With a tool called Websploit, hackers can scan targets for these hidden directories without difficulty.

How To: Detect Vulnerabilities in a Web Application with Uniscan

With the number of web applications out there today, it comes as no surprise that there are just as many vulnerabilities waiting for hackers to discover. Finding those vulnerabilities can be a difficult task, but there are plenty of tools available to make the process easier. While it won't help find any zero-days, web scanners such as Uniscan will detect common vulnerabilities.

How To: Leverage a Directory Traversal Vulnerability into Code Execution

Directory traversal, or path traversal, is an HTTP attack which allows attackers to access restricted directories by using the ../ characters to backtrack into files or directories outside the root folder. If a web app is vulnerable to this, an attacker can potentially access restricted files that contain info about all registered users on the system, their permissions, and encrypted passwords.

How To: Beginner's Guide to OWASP Juice Shop, Your Practice Hacking Grounds for the 10 Most Common Web App Vulnerabilities

Web application vulnerabilities are one of the most crucial points of consideration in any penetration test or security evaluation. While some security areas require a home network or computer for testing, creating a test website to learn web app security requires a slightly different approach. For a safe environment to learn about web app hacking, the OWASP Juice Shop can help.

Hack Like a Pro: How to Hack Web Apps, Part 6 (Using OWASP ZAP to Find Vulnerabilities)

Welcome back, my tenderfoot hackers! Web apps are often the best vector to an organization's server/database, an entry point to their entire internal network. By definition, the web app is designed to take an input from the user and send that input back to the server or database. In this way, the attacker can send their malicious input back to the servers and network if the web app is not properly secured.

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