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How to Use PowerShell Empire: Getting Started with Post-Exploitation of Windows Hosts

PowerShell Empire is a post-exploitation framework for computers and servers running Microsoft Windows, Windows Server operating systems, or both. In these tutorials, we will be exploring everything from how to install Powershell Empire to how to snoop around a victim's computer without the antivirus software knowing about it. If we are lucky, we might even be able to obtain domain administrator credentials and own the whole network.

How To: Simulate a RAT on Your Network with ShinoBOT

A remote administration tool, or RAT, is a piece of software used for remotely controlling machines. They are commonly used by tech support to gain remote access for troubleshooting purposes, but RATs are also an important part of a hacker's advanced persistent threat (APT) toolkit. Unlike standard administration RATs, these tools are designed to be delivered stealthily and operate undetected.

How To: Set Up SoftEther VPN on Windows to Keep Your Data Secure

Imagine for a moment that a VPN is like putting on a disguise for your computer. This disguise works to change your IP address, secure your traffic with encryption, and mask your location to bypass regional restrictions. This makes it a helpful tool for both whistleblowers and journalists. VPNs are also built into the well-known Tor Browser.

How To: Install OpenVAS for Broad Vulnerability Assessment

OpenVAS is a powerful vulnerability assessment tool. Forked from Nessus after Nessus became a proprietary product, OpenVAS stepped in to fill the niche. OpenVAS really shines for information gathering in large networks where manual scanning to establish a foothold can be time-consuming. OpenVAS is also helpful for administrators who need to identify potential security issues on a network.

How To: Wardrive on an Android Phone to Map Vulnerable Networks

Tossing an old Android smartphone with a decent battery into your hacking kit can let you quickly map hundreds of vulnerable networks in your area just by walking or driving by them. The practice of wardriving uses a Wi-Fi network card and GPS receiver to stealthily discover and record the location and settings of any nearby routers, and your phone allows you to easily discover those with security issues.

How To: Steal macOS Files with the USB Rubber Ducky

If you need a tiny, flexible attack platform for raining down human-interface-device (HID) attacks on unattended computers, the USB Rubber Ducky is the most popular tool for the job. By loading the Ducky with custom firmware, you can design new attacks to be effective against even air-gapped computers without internet access. Today, you'll learn to write a payload to make "involuntary backups" through copying a targeted folder to the Ducky's USB mass storage.

How To: Modify the USB Rubber Ducky with Custom Firmware

The USB Rubber Ducky comes with two software components, the payload script to be deployed and the firmware which controls how the Ducky behaves and what kind of device it pretends to be. This firmware can be reflashed to allow for custom Ducky behaviors, such as mounting USB mass storage to copy files from any system the Duck is plugged into.

How To: Seize Control of a Router with RouterSploit

A router is the core of anyone's internet experience, but sadly most people don't spend much time setting up this critical piece of hardware. Old firmware, default passwords, and other configuration issues continue to haunt many organizations. Exploiting the poor, neglected computer inside these routers has become so popular and easy that automated tools have been created to make the process a breeze.

Social Engineering: How to Use Persuasion to Compromise a Human Target

Social engineering makes headlines because human behavior is often the weakest link of even well-defended targets. Automated social engineering tools can help reclusive hackers touch these techniques, but the study of how to hack human interactions in person is often ignored. Today, we will examine how to use subtle, hard to detect persuasion techniques to compromise a human target.

How to Hack Radio Frequencies: Hijacking FM Radio with a Raspberry Pi & Wire

In our first part on software-defined radio and signals intelligence, we learned how to set up a radio listening station to find and decode hidden radio signals — just like the hackers who triggered the emergency siren system in Dallas, Texas, probably did. Now that we can hear in the radio spectrum, it's time to explore the possibilities of broadcasting in a radio-connected world.

How To: Load & Use Keystroke Injection Payloads on the USB Rubber Ducky

Keystroke injection attacks are popular because they exploit the trust computers have in human interface devices (HIDs). One of the most popular and easily accessible keystroke injection tools is the USB Rubber Ducky from Hack5, which has a huge range of uses beyond simple HID attacks. The USB Rubber Ducky can be used to attack any unlocked computer in seconds or to automate processes and save time.

How To: Punchabunch Just Made SSH Local Forwarding Stupid Easy

SSH local forwarding is a must for covering your tracks and getting out there to do your work. Also called SSH tunneling, this process will put one or more steps between your machine and the machine you're working on, for security and other purposes. It can be a bit daunting for newbies to get down, and that's where Punchabunch comes in.

How To: Create a Reusable Burner OS with Docker, Part 2: Customizing Our Hacking Container

In the first part of my containers series, we learned how to install Docker on our local machine, pull down "hello-world" and Ubuntu containers, SSH into containers, and install software when in a container. Now, we're going to work on building, customizing, and storing our refined hacking Ubuntu container. Before we dive right in, though, let's make sure we still have a functional Docker installation.

How To: Create a Reusable Burner OS with Docker, Part 1: Making an Ubuntu Hacking Container

Containers are isolated software instances representing applications, servers, and even operating systems—complete with all of their dependencies, libraries configuration files, etc.—and they're taking over the corporate world. The ephemeral, portable nature of containers help them stay current and speedy, and they can work on pretty much any computer, virtual machine, and cloud.

How To: Slip a Backdoor into PHP Websites with Weevely

Backdoors are convenient to leave behind once you've already found a way into a server, and they can come in handy for a variety of reasons. They're good for developers who want a quick way into machines they're working on, or for systems administrators who want similar access. Of course, backdoors are also a hacker's best friend, and can be added in a variety of ways. One good tool for doing this is Weevely, which uses a snippet of PHP code.

Mac for Hackers: How to Organize Your Tools by Pentest Stages

With all of the bare-bones setup out of the way in our Mac for Hackers series, your Apple machine should be ready to run a significant amount of pentesting tools. We can pull tools from GitHub and compile them, we can pull dependencies or tools from Homebrew, we have both Python and Ruby. Everything is ready to go and now it's time to start building a toolbox on our local host.

How To: Install Gitrob on Kali Linux to Mine GitHub for Credentials

GitHub is an extremely popular site that allows developers to store source code and interact with other users about their projects. Anyone can download public, open-source files on GitHub manually or with Git, and anyone can fork off someone's project to expand or improve it into its own project. It's a really great site for programmers, developers, and even inspiring hackers.

How To: An Intro to Vim, the Unix Text Editor Every Hacker Should Be Familiar With

As pentesters and hackers, we're going to be working with text frequently—wordlists, configuration files, etc. A lot of this we'll be doing on our own machine, where we have access to whatever editor we prefer. The rest of it will be on remote machines, where the tools for editing will be limited. If nano is installed, we have an easy-to-use terminal text editor, but it isn't very powerful.

How To: Use UFONet

With the release of the Mirai source code, botnets are back in a big way. In the early days of botnets, zombies (infected hosts) would report to IRC (Internet Relay Chat) channels for CNC (command and control) instructions. Modern botnets have evolved, but they continue to use the same concepts as their predecessors.

Mac for Hackers: How to Create an Encrypted Disk Image

Before we dive any further into getting your Mac ready for hacking, I wanted to continue on with the concept of encryption. In the last part, we talked about full disk encryption on your Mac, but now I want to quickly cover the encryption of disk images before we dive into managing passwords, terminal emulators, etc.

How To: Use a Misconfigured SUID Bit to Escalate Privileges & Get Root

Gaining access to a system is always exciting, but where do you go from there? Root or bust. Sure, a compromised host is a great way to run a botnet, or do some other boring, nefarious thing—but as hackers, we want root. We also want to take the easiest path possible, search out low-hanging fruit, and exploit them. SUID programs are the lowest of the low-hanging fruit.

How To: Diceware Gives You Truly Random Yet Easy-to-Memorize Passwords

Passwords are everywhere. We use them to unlock phones, computers, websites, encrypted disks, encrypted files... the list just goes on and on. Savvy users will already have a password manager of some sort that can generate a very strong password on a per site basis. However, these password managers also require a password. Not only that, it has to be something memorable.

Mac for Hackers: How to Get Your Mac Ready for Hacking

When it comes to hacking guides, most are written from the perspective of a Linux user. There are a few outliers, but it's mainly Linux, which leads to the idea that Linux is the only OS that's viable for hacking. This couldn't be further from the truth. A properly set up Apple machine can do quite a bit of heavy lifting.

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