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How To: Protect Your Identity After the Equifax Cyberattack

Equifax reported on Sept. 7 that it discovered a breach on July 29 which affects roughly half of Americans, many of whom don't realize they have dealings with the company. Hackers got away with social security numbers, addresses, and driver's license numbers, foreshadowing a "nuclear explosion of identity theft." Let's explore what really happened and what you and those around you can do to protect yourselves.

How To: Boot Multiple Operating Systems on the Raspberry Pi with BerryBoot

The Raspberry Pi loads an operating system from whatever SD card you insert, allowing you to keep different operating systems on separate SD cards depending on which OS you wish to run. A tool called BerryBoot cuts down on the number of SD cards needed by providing the ability to boot multiple operating systems from a single SD card, similar to Boot Camp for Mac computers. With BerryBoot, a single 32 GB SD card can hold multiple penetration testing tools and distros.

How To: Have Your Passwords Ever Been Leaked Online? Find Out with PwnedList

It seems like every other day there's a new security threat or data leak in the news. Whether it's your credit card PIN or your smartphone's apps leaking your email address, no one wants their personal information out there, especially passwords. And if you use the same email address and/or password for more than one site, the effects of someone getting hold of your credentials can be catastrophic.

News: A Brief History of Hacking

Welcome back, my fledgling hackers! Hacking has a long and storied history in the U.S. and around the world. It did not begin yesterday, or even at the advent of the 21st century, but rather dates back at least 40 years. Of course, once the internet migrated to commercial use in the 1990s, hacking went into hyperdrive.

How To: Set Up a Headless Raspberry Pi Hacking Platform Running Kali Linux

The Raspberry Pi is a credit card-sized computer that can crack Wi-Fi, clone key cards, break into laptops, and even clone an existing Wi-Fi network to trick users into connecting to the Pi instead. It can jam Wi-Fi for blocks, track cell phones, listen in on police scanners, broadcast an FM radio signal, and apparently even fly a goddamn missile into a helicopter.

How To: Set Up a Practice Computer to Kill on a Raspberry Pi 3

The world is full of vulnerable computers. As you learn how to interact with them, it will be both tempting and necessary to test out these newfound skills on a real target. Today, I'll introduce a deliberately vulnerable Raspberry Pi image designed to help you practice and take your hacking skills to the next level.

How To: Set Up Kali Linux on the New $10 Raspberry Pi Zero W

In five short years, three generations of ultra-low-cost Raspberry Pi devices have challenged the boundaries of what a person can do with a $35 computer. With each more powerful and cheaper than the last, the addition of the Pi Zero in 2015 took the same Broadcom BCM2835 processor from the original Pi and put it on a tiny 1.18-inch board. This tiny form factor has powered attacks like PoisonTap and even drones, but the one thing lacking has been the connectivity of the Pi 3.

Guide: Wi-Fi Cards and Chipsets

Greetings aspiring hackers. I have observed an increasing number of questions, both here on Null-Byte and on other forums, regarding the decision of which USB wireless network adapter to pick from when performing Wi-Fi hacks. So in today's guide I will be tackling this dilemma. First I will explain the ideal requirements, then I will cover chipsets, and lastly I will talk about examples of wireless cards and my personal recommendations. Without further ado, let's cut to the chase.

How To: Load & Use Keystroke Injection Payloads on the USB Rubber Ducky

Keystroke injection attacks are popular because they exploit the trust computers have in human interface devices (HIDs). One of the most popular and easily accessible keystroke injection tools is the USB Rubber Ducky from Hack5, which has a huge range of uses beyond simple HID attacks. The USB Rubber Ducky can be used to attack any unlocked computer in seconds or to automate processes and save time.

How To: Wardrive on an Android Phone to Map Vulnerable Networks

Tossing an old Android smartphone with a decent battery into your hacking kit can let you quickly map hundreds of vulnerable networks in your area just by walking or driving by them. The practice of wardriving uses a Wi-Fi network card and GPS receiver to stealthily discover and record the location and settings of any nearby routers, and your phone allows you to easily discover those with security issues.

How To: Turn Any Phone into a Hacking Super Weapon with the Sonic

The Watch Dogs video game series came out in 2014, enamoring audiences with the idea of a seemingly magical smartphone that could change traffic signals, hack web cameras, and even remotely control forklifts. This may sound like science fiction, but The Sonic uses a customized flavor of Kali Linux to allow you to unleash the power of Kali from any smartphone — all without the need to create a hotspot to control it.

How To: Introduction to Modern Cryptography

Cryptography is the science of keeping secrets, or more specifically, the science of disguising them. As a point of fact, cryptography has progressed quite a bit farther and now encompasses file and message integrity, sender authentication, and pseudo-random number generators.

How to Hack Wi-Fi: Creating an Evil Twin Wireless Access Point to Eavesdrop on Data

Welcome back, my greenhorn hackers! Now that we're familiar with the technologies, terminology, and the aircrack-ng suite, we can finally start hacking Wi-Fi. Our first task will be to creating an evil twin access point. Many new hackers are anxious to crack Wi-Fi passwords to gain some free bandwidth (don't worry, we'll get to that), but there are so many other Wi-Fi hacks that are far more powerful and put so much more at risk than a bit of bandwidth.

How To: Protect Yourself from Someone Trying to Hack into Your Mac

If you read my previous post, "How to Hack into a Mac Without the Password", you know that it is very easy to break into someone's Mac if you have physical access to the computer. Now the question that lies is, how do we protect ourselves from this happening to us? Well, here is a way that guarantees that no one will be able to change your password through OS X Recovery.

News: How Zero-Day Exploits Are Bought & Sold

Most of you already know that a zero-day exploit is an exploit that has not yet been revealed to the software vendor or the public. As a result, the vulnerability that enables the exploit hasn't been patched. This means that someone with a zero-day exploit can hack into any system that has that particular configuration or software, giving them free reign to steal information, identities, credit card info, and spy on victims.

How To: Convert Python Script to Exe

There are a lot of great tutorials on Null Byte using Python to create backdoors, reverse shells etc, so I thought it might be worthwhile making a tutorial on how to convert these python scripts to exe files for Windows victim machines.

How To: Stay as Anonymous as Possible Online

There are lots of people who want to stay anonymous online, and lots of reasons they want to do this. Staying anonymous on the internet isn't easy, and it's probably possible to trace almost anyone with enough time and resources. A lot of people think that they're completely secure with just one method of cover. For example, a lot of people thought anyone using the Tor network was nearly untraceable, but then things like this often cast doubt on just how secure these networks are. Unless you ...

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